discography

The Sharp Things, EverybodyEverybody album art

EverybodyEverybody

“Drawing inspiration from Brian Wilson and George Harrison to Bowie and Harry Nilsson, EverybodyEverybody is a master class in songwriting and execution.” — Blurt

Adventurer's Inn

Adventurer's Inn

“‘Everything Breaks’ manages the uncommon trick of being both lovely and urgent…an elegiac litany of facts, descriptions, and/or circumstances, creating a kind of beauty-meets-tragedy atmosphere” — Fingertips Music

The Sharp Things Live at Galapagos Art Space

Live at Galapagos Art Space

“Live At Galapagos Art Space ticks off all the right boxes and more…orchestral pop at its best.”

The Sharp Things, The Truth Is Like The Sun album cover [front]

The Truth Is Like The Sun

The Truth Is Like The Sun takes an even more scenic route to its destination than did Green Is Good. It is the most distinctive release I have heard this year. It may also be the single best.”
Pop That Goes Crunch

The Sharp Things, Green Is Good album cover [front]

Green Is Good

“One of the more intriguing releases in quite some time…seamlessly stitches together dozens of different influences into a cohesive quilt of modern pop…not a bum track out of ten!”
— Pop That Goes Crunch!

A Moveable Feast album art

A Moveable Feast

“This album is rich, deep, full, and at times revelatory. And yet wasn’t recorded in a studio! This is Orchestral Pop of the highest order. It’s The Mamas and the Papas with strings. It’s a more contemporary, less preachy Blood Sweat and Tears.” —Berkeley Place

Foxes & Hounds album art

Foxes & Hounds

“His melodies are classic, unfettered lumps of yum, his arrangements seemed plucked from a different era and on the whole, Perry Serpa and his NYC-based orchestral pop outfit the Sharp Things have a wonderfully timeless quality to them.” —The Spill

Here Comes The Sharp Things album art

Here Comes The Sharp Things

“Musically, this is head-shaking astonishing, alternately recalling The Smiths, Divine Comedy, the Bad Seeds and even early Elton John, a sort of grandiose collision of English folk and chamber music, with jazz and country flourishes.” —Flaunt